Yugen | Posts tagged 'astronomy'

Posts filled under: astronomy

spaceplasma:

Photographs of Saturn constructed in false color

These Saturn photographs have been constructed in false color, obtained Aug. 19 by Voyager 2 from a range of 7.1 million kilometers (4.4 million miles)


Credit: NASA

sagansense:

On The Day Carl Sagan Died.

To all those who participated in the celebration of Carl Sagan Day, thank you. But just as such celebrated days like “Mother’s Day” or “Valentine’s Day” or even “Black History Month” are mere holidays invented by humans to reflect on our history to show/value a bit more care & concern to our loved ones, Carl Sagan Day, just as the rest of them, are not to be taken literally.

We should never wait for a single celebratory day or month to showcase our passion for others.

Just as you would show love & affection, care & concern to your loved ones without the overly-hyped traditions & holidays we’ve created simply to pause for a brief moment each year, reminding us of what we already should be doing as loving beings existing within the same cosmic time frame, so should we honor & uphold Carl Sagan’s legacy, person & passion toward the world & all beings & creatures whom inhabit it.

Whimsically tipping a hat to a person’s life history such as Carl’s & going about one’s life without a mere thought or contemplation over what it means to be human & to be a supporter of Carl & his imprint on our lives, is such to the degree of someone removing the lunar module, personal items & smearing away the footprints left by our astronauts on the Moon & Mars, placing this society’s selfish influences over our individual perspectives & own accomplishments as well. 

Carl’s passion for others & more specifically, intelligence of others & their brain’s capability of being able to grasp the universe on a sophisticated to basic understanding will never be forgotten or ‘smeared away’ by all of us who continually remind ourselves, our loved ones & our fellow humans of the great & humble contributions this man has made on our lives. 

Thank you all for contributing once again. Whether or not Carl Sagan Day becomes a nationally recognized time piece for the past, present & future, let us keep in mind that we still continue to breath the air & molecules as Carl Sagan, Albert Einstein, Isaac Newton, Nikola Tesla once did….& although we primarily owe our existence to the smallest of biological organisms on this planet, we share more than this with past, present & future humans in our lives due to the everlasting impression others have left on our minds…physically, physiologically, neurologically, chemically & anatomically on our brain itself.

Let us continue to delight, reminisce, celebrate & share Carl Edward Sagan’s existence with others by self-educating ourselves persistently & further emphasizing the vital importance within our species & planet of science, education & global scientific literacy.

sagan|sense

sagansense:

On The Day Carl Sagan Died.

To all those who participated in the celebration of Carl Sagan Day, thank you. But just as such celebrated days like “Mother’s Day” or “Valentine’s Day” or even “Black History Month” are mere holidays invented by humans to reflect on our history to show/value a bit more care & concern to our loved ones, Carl Sagan Day, just as the rest of them, are not to be taken literally.

We should never wait for a single celebratory day or month to showcase our passion for others.

Just as you would show love & affection, care & concern to your loved ones without the overly-hyped traditions & holidays we’ve created simply to pause for a brief moment each year, reminding us of what we already should be doing as loving beings existing within the same cosmic time frame, so should we honor & uphold Carl Sagan’s legacy, person & passion toward the world & all beings & creatures whom inhabit it.

Whimsically tipping a hat to a person’s life history such as Carl’s & going about one’s life without a mere thought or contemplation over what it means to be human & to be a supporter of Carl & his imprint on our lives, is such to the degree of someone removing the lunar module, personal items & smearing away the footprints left by our astronauts on the Moon & Mars, placing this society’s selfish influences over our individual perspectives & own accomplishments as well.

Carl’s passion for others & more specifically, intelligence of others & their brain’s capability of being able to grasp the universe on a sophisticated to basic understanding will never be forgotten or ‘smeared away’ by all of us who continually remind ourselves, our loved ones & our fellow humans of the great & humble contributions this man has made on our lives.

Thank you all for contributing once again. Whether or not Carl Sagan Day becomes a nationally recognized time piece for the past, present & future, let us keep in mind that we still continue to breath the air & molecules as Carl Sagan, Albert Einstein, Isaac Newton, Nikola Tesla once did….& although we primarily owe our existence to the smallest of biological organisms on this planet, we share more than this with past, present & future humans in our lives due to the everlasting impression others have left on our minds…physically, physiologically, neurologically, chemically & anatomically on our brain itself.

Let us continue to delight, reminisce, celebrate & share Carl Edward Sagan’s existence with others by self-educating ourselves persistently & further emphasizing the vital importance within our species & planet of science, education & global scientific literacy.

sagan|sense

sciencesoup:

Badass Scientist of the Week: Dr. Carl Sagan

Carl Sagan (1934–1996) was an astronomer, a skeptic, a science communicator and—to many—a poet. As a child he was fascinated with the stars, and this deep sense of wonder at the universe never abated all throughout his adult life. He studied at the University of Chicago, achieving his doctorate in astronomy and astrophysics by 1960, and over the next ten years, he held teaching and research posts at various universities and observatories. In 1970, he became director of Cornell University’s Laboratory for Planetary Studies and the David Duncan Professor of Astronomy and Space Sciences. At the same time, he played a leading role as a consultant at NASA, briefing the Apollo astronauts and being closely associated with unmanned planetary missions too, most notably the Mariner, Viking, Voyager, and Galileo expeditions. His research transformed planetary science, helping to solve mysteries such as the high temperatures of Venus, the seasonal changes of Mars and the reddish haze of Titan, and he also was a pioneer of the study of extraterrestrial life—but Carl is best known as a science communicator. In his award-winning books and his enormously popular 1980 TV series Cosmos, he captured the hearts and minds of millions with his easy charisma, his ability to explain difficult concepts, and his infectious wonder for the universe. His insights about our fragile world live on today as his legacy, and the way he continues to change the public’s perception of science is perhaps his greatest achievement—showing us that examining our universe using natural curiosity and the tools of science is a joyous, awe-inspiring endeavour. Happy birthday, Carl, and thank you for everything you’ve given us.

biomedicalephemera:

A Candle in the Dark

Much more recent a figure than my other Important People, I feel Carl Sagan deserves a mention today. His birthday was November 9, 1934.

I am not nearly eloquent or knowledgeable enough compared to others I know to comment on his amazing works and his pioneering the concept of making science accessible (and cool!) to the public, but I appreciate them and love the works all the same.

He was not just a television figure, a host of a TV show, as captivating and renowned as Cosmos was. He was a real astronomer, an astrophysicist, a man who worked on real satellites, and looked through telescopes in laboratories, and realized things like the fact that Venus is, in reality, a hot and dry hellscape, and not a balmy paradise as once imagined.

From the beginning of his career, Sagan was the advocate that science needed. In a time that scientists and officials scoffed at the notion of bringing science to the masses, Sagan realized how important it was for the general population to, at the very least, be interested in and value science, even if they didn’t understand the deeper concepts involved. You don’t need to be a rocket scientist to see the value of learning about our planet from a perspective we’ve never seen before.

Before his death in 1996, Carl Sagan designed the plaque and record that traveled on the Voyager satellites, that represented all of humankind to any civilization or species that might intercept them, millions or billions of years in the future. He was also involved in establishing SETI -the institute for the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. He also authored Contact, which would later be made into an award-winning movie starring Jodie Foster, and many books regarding humanity’s presence in the universe and the possibility for extraterrestrial life. He was a pioneer in promoting skepticism and scientific thinking in day-to-day life, and showed people how amazing and fantastical their own world was, their own planet was, how much more wonderful reality was than anything we could ever dream up.

Images:
Quote from Cosmos, “Pale Blue Dot” - The Earth, as it appears from Pluto, photographed by Voyager 1
Allen Radio Telescope Array at SETI

Carl Sagan portrait by Pat Linse - “An Awful Hole, A Wonderful Life” by Michael Shermer via Skeptic
“Sounds of Earth” - the golden record carried on Voyager 1 and 2

Happy birthday, Carl.

thecosmicconundrum:

I’m so glad we Earthlings had the chance to know you, and that you used your platform for the noblest of things: to educate and inspire millions.

jtotheizzoe:

What would the “sun” in the sky look like if we orbited in the “habitable zone” of one of the largest known stars?

This is why I love the Reddit science community. The mockup of what the star VY Canis Majoris (a red hypergiant about 3,900 light years away) would look like in a “livable” sky was made by Redditor LuridTeaParty.

If you’d like to know more about this large star, its gravity, how much light and energy it gives off and how far we’d be from it in order for Earth to not boil or freeze, check out the full thread.

Posted on October 6, 2012

Reblogged from: sagan|sense

Source: nasagifs

Notes: 625 notes

Tags: NASA,gif,astronomy,

hydrogeneportfolio:

Minimal Posters - Five Groundbreaking Moments In Astronomy.

invado:

Jupiter is gorgeous 

Posted on September 17, 2012

Reblogged from: Astrotastic!

Source: invado

Notes: 457 notes

Tags: astronomy,science,

the-star-stuff:

New Theory: A “Hit and Run” Accident Created Our Moon

How did Earth get its own Moon? For decades, the most popular origin story has been the “Big Splat” theory, which says an object the size of Mars impacted the Earthmore than three billion years ago, flinging material into space which became the Moon.

But now there’s new evidence that the Big Splat theory may be incorrect — and the impact that created the Moon may have been more like a hit-and-run accident.

Read the full study in Nature Geoscience.

jtotheizzoe:

project-argus:

NPR: Hubble Captures Time-Lapse Videos Of Stars Being Born

(Movies of jets from young stars at HubbleSite: here)

If you’re like me and maybe a little confused as to what you’re looking at, here’s some more detail (Yes, even Joe has to look stuff up sometimes): 

As a star is formed from collapsing dust, ever increasing its density and energy, it begins to form a disk of dust and gas pulled in and rotated by its growing gravity. Perpendicular to this disk, like the tip of a spinning top, some gas is ejected away from the growing star in a high-energy jet. As this collides with interstellar gas, it gives off radiation, which we can observe with telescopes like Hubble.

To see the jets, we have to shift into the infrared and other spectra, as the radiation is outside normal human vision. These movies represent the first time we’ve seen the dynamics of the jets as opposed to still images. More info on protostellar jets here, you star-freaks.

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