Yugen | Posts tagged 'Math'

Posts filled under: Math

staceythinx:

These gifs demonstrate how a zipper and a constant velocity joint work. You can find more instructive gifs in Twisted Sifter’s gallery of 20 Animated Gifs that Explain How Things Work.

OpenCulture - Math: Free Courses

theincompletenesstheorem:

educatingearth:

Get free Math courses from the world’s leading universities. You can download these audio & video courses straight to your computer or mp3 player. For more online courses, visit our complete collection of Free Courses.

  • Abstract Algebra Multiple Formats – Benedict Gross – Harvard
  • Analytic Geometry and CalculusYouTubeiTunes Video – Benjamin Johnson, UC Berkeley
  • Analytic Geometry and Calculus (Continuation of above)YouTubeiTunes Video, Thomas Scanlon, UC Berkeley
  • CalculusiTunes Audio – F. Michael Christ, UC Berkeley
  • Calculus 1 - Web - Matthew Leingang, NYU
  • Calculus Revisited: Single Variable Calculus (1970)YouTube -iTunes VideoWeb Site – Herb Gross, MIT
  • Computational Science and Engineering I iTunesYouTube –Web Site – Gilbert Strang, MIT
  • Core Science MathematicsYouTube – SK Ray, IIT
  • Differential EquationsYouTubeiTunesWeb Site – MIT – Arthur Mattuck
  • Engineering Statistics - Web Site – Carnegie Mellon
  • Geometric Folding Algorithms:Linkages, Origami, Polyhedra -Web Site – Erik Demaine, MIT
  • Introduction to Probability and StatisticsYouTubeiTunes Video – Deborah Nolan, UC Berkeley
  • Introductory Probability and Statistics for Business YouTubeiTunes – Fletcher Ibser, UC Berkeley
  • Introduction to Statistics - iTunes – Fletcher Ibser, UC Berkeley
  • Linear AlgebraYouTubeiTunesWeb Site – Gilbert Strang, MIT
  • Logic & Proofs - Web Site – Carnegie Mellon
  • Multivariable Calculus - YouTube - iTunesWeb Site - Dennis Auroux, MIT
  • Probability for Math ScienceiTunesYouTube – Herbert Enderton, UCLA
  • Sets, Counting, and Probability - Multiple Formats – Paul Bamberg, Harvard
  • Single Variable Calculus YouTubeiTunesUWeb Site – David Jerison, MIT
  • StatisticsWeb Site – Carnegie Mellon
  • Statistics: Introduction to ProbabilityiTunes Video – Joseph Blitzstein, Harvard
  • The Calculus LifesaveriTunes Video - Adrian Banner, Princeton

For a full lineup of online courses, please visit our complete collection ofFree Courses. Also find free math textbooks in our Free Textbookcollection.

:D I’m so glad I found this!

logicianmagician:

themathkid:

What.

Finally, a math book relevant to my interests. 

logicianmagician:

themathkid:

What.

Finally, a math book relevant to my interests. 

themathkid:

In the 1950s, Solomon W. Golomb investigated the question: how few cells can you remove from an 8×8 square to exclude the shape of a given polyomino? His book Polyominoes shows minimal exclusions for all polyominoes up through order 5. Presented here are the minimal known exclusions of hexominoes from an 8×8 square. The solutions shown are not necessarily unique.

themathkid:

In the 1950s, Solomon W. Golomb investigated the question: how few cells can you remove from an 8×8 square to exclude the shape of a given polyomino? His book Polyominoes shows minimal exclusions for all polyominoes up through order 5. Presented here are the minimal known exclusions of hexominoes from an 8×8 square. The solutions shown are not necessarily unique.

themathkid:

You either get it or you don’t. [TAUTOLOGY!]

themathkid:

You either get it or you don’t. [TAUTOLOGY!]

matthen:

Bouncing balls in a circle gives one of the simplest systems to exhibit chaos, as was pointed out in a comment by Andrew Moylan.  The animation above shows two balls which start off with almost exactly the same speed and location, but before long they are travelling along completely different trajectories. Such high sensitivity to the initial conditions defines chaos. 

In this visualisation, each point in the circle is given a colour in a rainbow pattern. The animation shows at each time where a ball dropped at each point within the circle has ended up, by colouring that point appropriately. For example at the first frame, all the balls are stationary, and we see the rainbow pattern. Then as time progresses, the balls drop down and the pattern correspondingly goes up. A black band appears and moves up, which shows which balls are doing their first bounce. Soon the order disappears- it looks random like the divergence of the two balls above. [more] [code]

matthen:

Bouncing balls in a circle gives one of the simplest systems to exhibit chaos, as was pointed out in a comment by Andrew Moylan.  The animation above shows two balls which start off with almost exactly the same speed and location, but before long they are travelling along completely different trajectories. Such high sensitivity to the initial conditions defines chaos

Chaos Visualisation

In this visualisation, each point in the circle is given a colour in a rainbow pattern. The animation shows at each time where a ball dropped at each point within the circle has ended up, by colouring that point appropriately. For example at the first frame, all the balls are stationary, and we see the rainbow pattern. Then as time progresses, the balls drop down and the pattern correspondingly goes up. A black band appears and moves up, which shows which balls are doing their first bounce. Soon the order disappears- it looks random like the divergence of the two balls above. [more] [code]

azspot:

David Fitzsimmons
themathkid:

symmetricalstars:

themathkid:

The Catalan numbers give the number of ways to tile an n-sized stair case with exactly n rectangles. 

That’s so interesting!

Continuing on my previous post:
The 42 tilings here also represent the Catalan number C7. Surely there is a bijection from these tilings to the heptagon triangle dissections [see previous post]. Help me find it?

themathkid:

symmetricalstars:

themathkid:

The Catalan numbers give the number of ways to tile an n-sized stair case with exactly n rectangles. 

That’s so interesting!

Continuing on my previous post:

The 42 tilings here also represent the Catalan number C7. Surely there is a bijection from these tilings to the heptagon triangle dissections [see previous post]. Help me find it?

It is magic until you understand it; and it is mathematics thereafter.

— Bharati Krishna Tirthaji (via mathstalio)

Posted on July 16, 2012

Reblogged from: λx.x

Source: mathhombre

Notes: 176 notes

Tags: math,

Meet the first /written/ mathematical operation:

thatmathblog:

This is the Rhind Papyrus — and 18 foot long scroll which carries Egyptian problems pertaining to fractions, numeric patterns, surveying, etc. Written by the scribe Ahmes in roughly 1650 BC, it uses the earliest-discovered notation for a mathematical operation: addition is denoted by a pair of walking legs! (such as 2 *walking legs* 2 is 4)

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